Budding futures

“In a perfect world, there is no future,” I read yesterday in Sansal Boualem’s novel 2084. An interesting statement. When we think about the future, we almost automatically think about change, about things that are not yet here. “When I grow up, I want to be a doctor.” “Our day will come.” “Maybe later.”

That the future may be different than the now gives us hope. Maybe in the future we find a way to distribute wealth in a more equal manner. Maybe in the future we will find a cure. Maybe in the future we will learn that war is not necessary.

If everything is already perfect, it is not necessary to think about the future. Nothing needs to be solved. No solutions need to be delegated to a realm that has not yet manifested.

In a perfect world, there is no future.

But can a world without a future be perfect? No future is no development. No chance to become better at anything. No chance to become a better person. No buds growing into flowers.

To me, looking at the photography of the blossoms of the papaya tree implies a future. Next week, more flowers will have opened. The week after the first flowers will drop to the ground. After a month, on a different tree, the papaya fruit will start to grow, pollinated by this flower.

A world without a future is unthinkable to me. Look at these flowers. Who wants a world without a future, even if it is a perfect world?

Slowly by slowly

The chameleon is one of my favorite animals, and the rare occasions that I find a chameleon in the garden are very special. This one was very small, only about five centimeters – it’s probably a baby. Unfortunately, many people are scared of chameleons, and harm them. And I have to say, they are mysterious animals. Chameleons can change their color to match their surroundings. Today I learnt that in Afrikaans, the chameleon is known as ‘verkleurmannetjie’ – little man that changes colors. Chameleons are very shy. Their color makes them hard to spot, and besides that, chameleons make an effort not to make any sudden movements. They move slowly, haltingly – a bit like my internet connection at the moment…

 

Rock paintings?

I love to experiment with the editing of my photographs. What I like about this one is that it is so reminiscent of age-old rock paintings found in the region. Isn’t it wonderful that one can create such a thing?

Or do you like this version better:

20170409-DSC_4426-bewerkt-2-bewerkt

Pictures taken in Pilanesberg National Park, South Africa

Honor the small

We have a saying in the Netherlands, “Wie’t kleine niet eert, is’t grote niet weert”. It means something like ‘if you don’t honor the small, you’re ┬ánot worthy of the great’. It is what I say to myself if I pick up a penny that someone dropped.

But I think it’s also true for nature and photography. You don’t always have to go for the big and the dramatic – the elephants, lions, and the like. If you just step outside and pay attention to the smallest details, you may find even greater beauty!

Elephant on the road

This morning, according to the news, a herd of eight elephants on the loose near Pretoria are being led back into the game reserve they escaped from. I can’t imagine the sight of a herd of elephants trudging to the suburbs…

We met this bull on a recent visit to Pilanesberg National Park. In the bushes on either side of the road there the herd with several baby elephants was foraging. The aggressive bull would not let any car come close, let alone pass. We didn’t even attempt to get nearer. Elephants are said to be ‘gentle giants’, but to me they are the most scary animals one can encounter on a safari!