Klipspringer resting on a rock

One of my favorite animals since we first saw them in a zoo in the Netherlands. Klipspringer literally means ‘rock jumper’, and it is one of the things they do best. You can find them on rocky outcrops, although they are hard to spot because their coat blends in so well with the environment. Klipspringers are largely monogamous, and partners generally stay within five meters of each other. Females are generally a bit larger than the males, but only the males have short and spiky horns. Such a joy to find these in the wild!

Scrub hare grooming

An uncommon sighting of a scrub hare, grooming itself, during daytime. Usually, a hare will burrow a small hollow in the ground in which its body fits snugly. Lying flat, even predators cannot detect them because their color blends with the surroundings.

Black Rhinoceros

My first black rhino! The black rhino is actually not black in color, but brown or grey like its cousin the white rhino. One of the main differences between the black and the white rhino is the shape of its lips. The mouth of the black rhino has a slight V-shape, unlike the white rhino which has a straight mouth. This is why the species are also known as hook-lipped rhinoceros for the black, and square-lipped rhinoceros for the white.

Elephant

A majestic elephant bull in profile. Because of the threat of poaching, the number of really old and big male elephants has dwindled in the past decades. It is a joy to see them – and always a little scary too, I must say! The photo was taken in Pilanesberg National Park in South Africa. In this edit, the background is evenly coloured, and the shape of the elephant is stylized.

If you think this would look great on your wall: prints are available here.