Black rhino

This picture shows very clearly why the black rhino is also called hook-lipped. The triangular shape of the upper lip can almost be used like a finger to carefully pick branches from the ground or leaves from scrubs.
Happy World Rhino Day 2019!

Rhino and pied crow

A rhino with a pied crow perched precariously on its upper horn.
 
I’m trying not to see this as a symbolic picture about the fate of the rhinos…
 
Usually the oxpeckers fulfill the role of personal grooms, but sometimes crows will try to find sustenance – or possibly a ride? – as well. The rhino wasn’t too happy about this visitor though and flapped his ears to scare it off.

Baby rhino

An adorable baby rhino resting in the shade. Rhinos spend their days and nights grazing, only resting during the hottest hours of the day. After birth, a baby rhino can walk within an hour. A rhino is born without a horn, but the front horn becomes visible within one or two months. The back horn starts growing when the calf is about a year old. The calf will stay with its mother for about three years before setting off on its own.

On our way

Romance in the bush: a male and a female rhino walking down the road. We must have followed them in our car for over half an hour while they walked, stopped, grazed a bit, walked on. Beautiful animals.

Photo taken in Pilanesberg National Park, South Africa