Rhino in the evening light

Yesterday I saw the prize-winning documentary Stroop about rhino poaching and the trade in rhino horn in Asia. It’s so sad to know that our greed as human beings destroys the world around us. Why can’t we find a way to share, to go not for profit but for sustainability and livelihoods for workers? Look at this innocent creature, so mighty and strong, but so vulnerable to our vices. Will they still be with us in 50 years time?

White rhino kicking up dust

A rhino kicking up some dust with its feet. Rhinos shuffle their feet, thereby creating a small dust cloud, when they feel threatened or annoyed, for example by a car that gets too close. In this case the behavior didn’t seem directed at our car as the rhino was otherwise very relaxed and went on to pass an impressive amount of urine…

Baby rhino

An adorable baby rhino resting in the shade. Rhinos spend their days and nights grazing, only resting during the hottest hours of the day. After birth, a baby rhino can walk within an hour. A rhino is born without a horn, but the front horn becomes visible within one or two months. The back horn starts growing when the calf is about a year old. The calf will stay with its mother for about three years before setting off on its own.